Solar at full steam ahead!: In Adlershof, companies and researchers boasting outstanding expertise have fought ahead in transforming the difficult solar energy field into a profitable business

23. April 2015

Solar at full steam ahead!

In Adlershof, companies and researchers boasting outstanding expertise have fought ahead in transforming the difficult solar energy field into a profitable business

Die Budatec Geschäftsführer Alexander Dahlbüdding (links) und Dirk Buße. Bild: © Adlershof Special

Budatec CEO‘s Alexander Dahlbüdding (left) and Dirk Buße

Technologies thrive on innovative ideas, not give-away prices. This is confirmed by the undiminished growth of Adlershof solar energy enterprises and the productive research work on campus. For example, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB) researches into complex material systems that may contribute to the success of the energy transition. “Our work focuses on the development of efficient and cost effective thin-film solar cells,” explained Bernd Rech, spokesman for the HZB Renewable Energies Division. These solar cells consist of innovative inorganic compound semiconductors or of combinations with organic absorbers, so called hybrid solar cells. A professor of photovoltaics, Rech continued: “Yet also silicon is a highly interesting candidate for use in thin film solar cells.” Here, applications-oriented basic research aims to optimise the suitability of materials for use in extremely thin cells.

Rech is convinced: “In terms of efficiency, costs, and durability, the potential is still far from being exhausted.” He explained that new materials in particular would boost the feasibility of the relatively recent technology of photovoltaics over the following years. Rech acknowledged the outstanding international status of the research on campus: “Especially a location like Adlershof, with its profound materials and photonics expertise, can contribute towards advancing a technology that in recent years has proved its significant contribution to the generation of electricity.” Yet also Adlershof’s SMEs enjoy global relevance.

For instance, skytron energy GmbH, specialising in local and remote monitoring and regulating systems for photovoltaic power stations. In business since 1977, this company  has installed worldwide over 1,000 systems with a total capacity of five gigawatts peak (GWp), designed to safeguard smooth operations and optimise energy yields.
Managing Director Jörgen Klammer is proud of his company’s reputation as a leading provider of control and monitoring technology for large scale power plant. Just recently, this Adlershof company installed its monitoring technology in one of the largest solar power stations in Great Britain, the Kencot Hill Solar Farm.

Ranking among the hidden champions in their fields is also budatec GmbH, a systems manufacturer for the semiconductor and solar industries. Its speciality: vacuum soldering systems of various sizes up to fully automated production lines that are developed, manufactured, and marketed worldwide in Adlershof. Business is running well – so well, in fact, that the company will be moving to a larger building on Melli-Beese-Straße before the end of the year.

By Chris Löwer for Adlershof Special

www.helmholtz-berlin.de
www.skytron-energy.com
www.budatec.de

Related News

Francisco Baraona, Geschäftsführer von skytron energy. Bild: skytron® energy
skytron energy focuses on internationalisation
Local subsidiaries in USA and Japan / Establishment of a global service network
Oriana Solarkraftwerk Puerto Rico. Bild: skytron® energy
skytron energy chosen to equip largest power plant in the Caribbean
Adlershof company provides monitoring and supervision technology for a 57.6 MWp solar power plant in Puerto Rico
Adlershof Special 39, Titelbild. Bild: © Adlershof Special
Adlershof Special 39
Paving the way for future energies
Professor Bernd Rech vom Institut für Siliziumphotovoltaik am Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB). Bild: © Adlershof Special
New recipes from the silicon kitchen
Research projects of Helmholtz Institute Silicon Photovoltaics